Kusen
190. PDF Print E-mail
Written by News Administrator   
Saturday, 27 May 2017 15:58

 

Nyojo said to Dogen "Zazen is dropping off body and mind"

Dogen asked, "What is dropping off body and mind?"

Nyojo said, "When you just sit, you are free from the five sense desires and the five hindrances"

The five desires are the content of our experience: what, either in our mind or in our body, we see, feel, hear, taste or smell.

The five hindrances are our attitudes to that experience: the minds of attachment, aversion, torpor, agitation or doubt.

We are "free", not because our experience is voided, but because, from moment to moment, there is the possibility of being completely intimate with our experience, with our whole body mind. "Desire" is a partial response. "Mind" is a partial response.

Once you discover that something is just a covering, whether it is there or not, are you not free of it?

 

Last Updated on Saturday, 27 May 2017 16:02
 
189. PDF Print E-mail
Written by News Administrator   
Saturday, 27 May 2017 15:52

 

When we say 'body', there is often an unconscious dualism. The standard dualism is body/mind, but this is supported by ingrained habits within our language.

So, we often talk about 'head and body' ; the idea that our body is our torso and limbs. If someone touches our face, we think of it differently to someone touching our back. We think of our 'head' resting on our 'body', and so on.

This does several things, none of them good. By identifying part of the body as 'the body', we create a distance and we objectify. We reinforce a sense that 'I' am an indeterminate confection of head, brain and mind, and that the 'I' is separate from 'the body'.

To counter this, it is very helpful to give particular attention to the aliveness of our head and neck: our tongue, the roof of our mouth, the pulsing of our eyes and forehead, the musculature of our jaw and neck, and so on. Attention to this flows into attention to the whole body.

The Whole Body of vast expression. Within which is 'the mind'.

 

 

Last Updated on Saturday, 27 May 2017 16:02
 
188. PDF Print E-mail
Written by News Administrator   
Tuesday, 23 May 2017 14:55


When one side is illuminated, the other is dark.

There is a common idea that delusion is multifaceted, and nonduality is one. What if we are precisely mistaken?

Dogen said that being and time are one. He didn't say that when you see being, you see time too. That is the habitual perspective, imagining that our life takes place in time: the smear between here and elsewhere, here and nowhere.

He meant that when you see being, you just see being. Time disappears. One side is illuminated, the other is dark. When you see time, 'being' is just the noise in the huge mirror of this moment.

And likewise with, for example, self and world, expression and exertion, all tangled together to fit within a person.

When one side is illuminated, the others are dark.

 

Last Updated on Tuesday, 23 May 2017 14:56
 
187. PDF Print E-mail
Written by News Administrator   
Wednesday, 17 May 2017 18:23


All the different Buddhist forms of expression are sincere attempts by practitioners like ourselves to describe actual experience. 

Although the language might be conceptually very different, one does not exclude the other.

So in Tibetan Buddhism for example, there is a strong emphasis on karma, whereas in Zen the emphasis is more on the wholeness and oneness of everything ('Zenki'). 

It's easy to see how karma seems very apposite in describing some types of experience we have when sitting. Persistent feelings of shame for instance, seem more readily describable in terms of karma. 

And other types of experience, the random mental noise, or the odd sense we have sometimes of thoughts that seem to come from elsewhere, might be more fruitfully described in terms of zenki.

But we need to understand that this karma, although I am experiencing it, is not mine. It is the cascading of life through time. This moment of experience is a drop of water on the tip of an icicle hanging from a glacier of infinite size.

When we imagine the wholeness of everything, zenki, we are inclined to focus on this moment. But if wholeness is simply this moment, there would be an infinite number of wholenesses and that is not so.

So this wholeness must include what we call the past and what we call the future. Pivoted on the drop of water.


Last Updated on Wednesday, 17 May 2017 18:32
 
186. PDF Print E-mail
Written by News Administrator   
Wednesday, 17 May 2017 18:18

 

The most critical point in practice is for us to be completely intimate with our experience. When we are, attachment, aversion, torpor restlessness and doubt do not arise.


But no matter how often we drop the cloak of the self we keep finding it's there again, draping our head, draping our body. Hence the practice is endless.

Sometimes it's us doing Zazen. Sometimes it's the whole Universe expressing itself through this body.

 

 

Last Updated on Wednesday, 17 May 2017 18:22
 
More Articles...
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 5 of 42