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Thursday, 19 October 2017 16:14


Blue Cliff Record, Case 63

The Case: at Master Nansen's temple, two groups of monks were arguing about a cat. Nansen held up the cat and said "If you can speak then I will not kill it". The monks were silent. Nansen cut the cat in two.

Commentary:

1. Who is the one person within the temple who carries a sword? Manjusri, the bodhisattva of wisdom. He sits on the altar, atop the lion of courage.

1.1. So is it a real sword? Or a real cat? Given that a humble pillow can symbolise dependent origination, what more could a cat signify? What are monks really likely to be arguing about?

2. Dogen, in Zuimonki,  asks his students what they would have said in response to Nansen's demand. And then volunteers that he would have said to Nansen, "Why don't you cut the cat into one?" Wouldn't you be happily cut in two if you could say something this brilliant?

2.1. Isn't Dogen's point that the cat -reality- has already been cut in two? Nansen does not kill it, because it has already been 'killed' by the sword of duality, wielded by the disputatious monks. But Manjusri's sword is different. It cuts into one. How?